The 5 Pillars of Bankruptcy Law Firm Attractiveness

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5-pillars-wideHere are the five basic elements prospects use to judge bankruptcy law firms when making a decision on who to call. Meet their needs in these areas and you’re virtually guaranteed a steady stream of new cases. Fall short, and clients are potentially looking at your competitors for a better fit.

1.  Pricing
First and foremost, pricing is the dominant selection criteria driving the majority of potential filers of bankruptcy when choosing a law firm. As nearly all prospects are short on money, firms charging lower, more competitive fees will always get more cases than high-priced firms.

2.  Payment plans
Pricing is not the only factor, though. A low down payment (or even $0 to get started) can quickly convert a potential client into retaining your firm, even if you’re not the lowest priced bankruptcy firm in the area.

3.  Testimonials
In today’s social media world, prospects often seek the advice of others through reviews when choosing a bankruptcy attorney. Even if your firm has few to no posted online reviews, adding testimonials to your firm’s website can quickly make up for that lack of social-referral influence.

4.  Attorney likeability
Everything else aside, if a prospect simply does not like the personality of the attorney during his or her initial consult, pricing and payment plans may not be enough to still retain him or her. A positive, helpful, likeable personality, on the other hand, can often go a long way toward making up for other weaknesses in the 5 Pillars.

5.  Location
Prospects prefer to choose law firms that are conveniently located to them. If your firm is downtown or in a location with difficult or paid parking, prospects may choose to avoid showing up for their consult – and you’ll lose the opportunity to retain them. If your firm is in a less-than-desirable location, make up for the weakness by offering phone consults, or meeting the prospect at a more convenient neutral location.

Author: Jim Rauch

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